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Written by Carole

This week I have decided to post a series on different homemade chicken feeders. I am always looking for creative ways to feed my chickens made with items I may already have in my husband’s shop. It helps me to enjoy the benefits of raising and feeding chickens even more. I have been doing some research on a different forums, gathering photos and information on different ways to build a chicken feeder, so I have a variety to share with you.

My original intention (still is sometime in the near future) is to add a page to this blog with the information I have gathered so in the future any visitors that perhaps have not seen the different posts will easily find the information. I get several visits a day on this blog from people searching for information on ways to make a chicken feeder. So I plan on starting with the entries and eventually will end up making a permanent page.

Today I’m highlighting a PVC chicken feeder. It is also an automatic chicken feeder.

pvc chicken feederhomemade chicken feeder from PVC
These pictures came from Rooster Red in West GA. She wrote:

“Here is a feeder that was given to me recently by a friend. He used it to feed cracked corn to deer, but I use it to feed my RIR flock. It’s made from 2 pieces of 4″ pvc pipe, 1 elbow and 2 caps. There are drain holes drilled in the bottom in case rain blows in. There is no waste because the chickens can’t scratch or bill the feed out.”

What a great way to keep the feed up and out of scratching feet way. Thanks, Rooster, for allowing me to use your pictures. This homemade chicken feeder is a great idea!

If you are reading this and you have a homemade chicken feeder you have created, send me some pictures along with a little explanation. I will be glad to highlight in one of my postings.

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39 Responses to “Build A Chicken Feeder Series”

  1. I made that out of 4″ sewer pipe instead of PVC because it was MUCh cheaper. it cuts like butter with a hack saw. I made mines 4 1/2 feet tall and it is very awkward to fill up. 4′ would have been the perfet height. The bottom should be about 12″ long. I made mines a little smaller and it is okay for 2 chickens but not more than that.

    Hope that helps. gerat site!

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  2. Do you know or have any ideas to build an electric/electronic chicken feeder?
    Build one like an auto fish feeder which releases fish-feed by using an electric motor/system to a require amount & times. This will be good for free range chooks or lazy people. Also will prevent rats, mice, wild birds, etc.. from eating the feed. It can be mounted high to prevent mice/rats to get to the fee.

    Thanks.

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    Bryan Reply:

    Why not use a automatic feeders like deer and turkey hunters use? They can hold a large amount of feed, are designed to be weatherproof, are above ground so they’re rodent proof, can be solar powered, feed amount and time is programable, and are fairly inexpensive if you watch E-Bay.

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    leck Reply:

    Hi,

    That sounds perfect. However I have never seen a deer/turkey
    feeder which hunters use.
    Therefore please help where to see one. I’ll search for it on the
    net in the mean time.
    In where I am we hunt deer by stalking only and/or using dogs.
    I have seen deer in farms but they don’t use the feeder.

    Thank you.

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  3. Great idea. We’ve been trying to find something that would stay cleaner. Think I’ll try this with a variation — have it go through the wall and into the coop so that the food is protected from other animals.

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  4. great idea! i’m making one tomorrow! thanks for sharing.

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  5. great idea!! thanks for sharing.

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  6. buiding one of thesefeeders tommorow hope it works as good ast he other type
    george

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  7. I am so happy for this good idea I am building one tomorrow.

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  8. I like the looks of the PVC feeder, anyone have any ideal how many I would need for 14-16 chickens?

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    Carole Reply:

    Sue, I would think two would work adequately for you. I have about 10 chickens per feeder in my coops and have no problems thus far.

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    Sue Reply:

    Thank you, I’m new to raising chickens. I’m going through 2 50 lbs per week, hope this will cut down on the feed.

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  9. what a fabulous idea. Thank you sooo much. I am fed up of my chickens scratching our the feed from their floor based feeder. So much grain has been wasted not to mention encouraging rodents. I will be going to the depot tomorrow to buy the pieces to make one. Thanks again.

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    Carole Reply:

    Jacky, Glad you like the idea and hope it works as well for you as it does for me!

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  10. Thank you, that is really great information! I am going to build one of those. I also liked the idea of using an auto deer feeder, although I haven’t seen how they feed. Does anyone know if the feed is spread around, or just dropped to the ground? Is it controlled enough to put some kind of pan beneath it? I have 25 chickens and we are starting to get cold here (freezing temps) and I have heat tapes on their water (although the chickens seem to like cold water more than heated water)it is working to keep their water from freezing. If the PVC pipe or sewer pipe wouldn’t allow enough to eat at one time, I could do two of them, or at least use them for grit and oyster shell. This is a great idea! Thanks!!
    gil

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  11. I wonder if you could cut a channel up and down in the vertical piece of pvc, then place a piece of clear plexiglass in it. You could tell at a glance if the feeder needs to be refilled or not.

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  12. I’m building one using a 5 gallon bucket and a large plant pot saucer. However, this one looks much easier. I would make an “umbrella” over the feed area, using the piece which was cut out, to keep moisture from being a problem.

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  13. Was looking for something somewhat rodent proof and bird proof (sparrows). First, I didn’t want to attract rodents and second the sparrows eat so much of the chicken scratch and the chickens end up running out of food way to soon. So I needed something to prevent both the rodents/birds out, yet at the same time feed my chickens.

    Came across this interesting automatic feeder.

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  14. Super great idea I plan on building one this week. Thanks and God bless.
    MAC.

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  15. Here are plans for that Auto feeder in the uTube video

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  16. http://www.woodworkingcorner.com/feeder.php

    OOPS…including the link would help

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  17. Regarding the PVC feeder, you could use 6″ pipe for the vertical section, a 6″ to 4″ reducer, 4″ elbow, and the 4″ cut out horizontal section. This way, you could get the same volume (678.8 cubic inches) in a 24″ piece of 6″ pipe that you get from a 54″ piece of 4″ pipe (easier to fill since it’s 2 1/2 feet lower). The cool camo paint job would be optional. For full disclosure, I have not built or tested this setup.

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  18. Would you say this is more cost efficient then say, feeding the birds the appropriate amount each day. I am new to having chickens and just want to be as efficient as possible. I have read that they require approx. 1/4 lb. a day per bird… I mean is it even possible to overfeed? I am concerned for both health and money reasons. I want them to receive what they need for nutrition and not waste money by having glutenous chickens. Your help is much appreciated!

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    Tammy Reply:

    Chickens tend to eat just what they need. You want to protect the feed from rodents, coons and other birds. I have my feeder inside an enclosed run that attaches to the coop.

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  19. I did not read the whole blog but here is a thought; use a tee instead of an elbow for feeding higher numbers of chickens. You can have 2 troughs instead of one…

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  20. For those of you wondering how to make a deer corn feeder work, let me describe mine & how it evolved. I use mine for a few LARGE hogs under my barn. I had the feeder under the barn in the pen, but hanging from the rafters. It would throw the corn in every direction and too far for my liking. Round 2: I cut the end (bottom) off of a 5 gallon bucket and left the lid off the other end and screwed it to the hacked up corn feeder so the corn would sling out, hit the sides, and fall straight down. However, my boar hog could literally reach up and shake the corn feeder and eventually broke the barn rafter (he goes around 800#). Round 3: I moved the entire feeder above my barn rafters and outside their pen. Now it falls straight down but outside their pen. So I took a sheet of tin and curled the ends in lengthwise to make an 8′ long chute and angled it from under the cut off bucket up in the barn rafters downward into the pen. I tied it off loosely so if the pigs hit it, they won’t shake it and make corn fall. This has worked like a charm for a few years now. It has an electronic timer that I set to go off for 7 seconds twice a day and it feeds 3 full grown hogs no problem. I don’t see why a miniature version of this wouldn’t work for chickens. I just wish it wasn’t so much work to load four 50# sacks of corn into the hopper every week from an 8′ ladder! I hope this is described well enough for it to help someone.

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  21. What is the best height for the top of a pvc pipe feeder for adult buff orpingtons?
    I think having it at beak level would help prevent food waste, but I don’t want it to be a perch.
    I love this idea because I can understand it!
    thanks for any help .

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  22. I had a lot of 3″ pvc and all I had to do was get two caps and a ell. I sure works great. I only have 2 chickens.

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  23. I find all of the information and details about all natural feeds extremely interesting, that is why Fornazor is awesome. Fornazor offers many different types of feed for your animals. We focus on all natural ingredients full of protein. Their enriched feed ingredients include animal proteins, marine proteins, and vegetable proteins. Surprisingly, they are constantly growing and developing products to ensure the best feed possible and even their balance of nutrients in their poultry feed is one of a kind.

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  24. I had a bunch of 3″ pvc and all I had to do was buy a elbow, and two end caps. They were cheaper than 4″ pvc fittings. It works great since I only have two chickens.

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  25. I wonder if the birds would start eating non-stop and eat a week’s food in two days and get sick.I want to try this on ducks for a few days that I might be away.Please guide me.

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  26. I just purchased the materials to make one of these for my chicken tractor. Going to make it a double side stack so that I can open a larger trough that will be fed from both sides.

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  27. CharlysGardenPlace
    June 9th, 2012 at 2:58 pm

    What a great idea!
    I intend to modify for bunnies, using metal or tile on the edges to keep them from chewing on the plastic, so they don’t have intestinal problems… if that works, a larger version for the other animals. Sure does make it easier to feed everyone from a central location inside the “animal house”.
    The shape of the feeding slot is even a good idea for a waterer attached to a 5-gallon plastic bucket with an inverted “water cooler” jug.
    Thanks…

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  28. Hello

    I live in the city, but I have a second home in the country about an hour away. I want to keep chickens for mainly eggs, but my issue is caring for the chickens while I am not there from Monday through Friday. Does anyone have any ideas of how to accomplish this?

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  29. Feed and water you could take care of with dispensers such as this and a large enough fount. Your problem will be the eggs. If they sit in the nests for a week at a time you will have problems with breakage, chickens eating them, and spoilage.

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    Barb Reply:

    You said if eggs sit in a nest for a week you could have spoilage. I know NOTHING about chickens and fresh eggs (my daughter-in-law has chickens and roosters) and she says the eggs can stay 2 weeks in the nest and still be good. I came to this site just to try to find out if that is true and from what I’ve been reading – it is. Do you have a different opinion? I’d like to know from several people that have chickens for eggs – if this is true or not!

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