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Written by Carole

I think about my life just five years earlier and raising chickens was not part of it. Today raising chickens in my backyard has become a way of life for me and I cannot imagine it any other way. Without a chicken backyard fun would not be the same.

Another part of the fun of having chickens is watching my husband create chicken feeders from his homemade plans. He is so creative and comes up with ideas for all kinds of substitutes to the standard poultry equipment you see in the stores. Today I will be sharing another one of his feeder plans.

PVC Chicken Feeder plans

PVC Chicken Feeder
Supplies:
6″ PVC Pipe
Flower Pot Drain Base
4 Screws
Coffee Container Lid

Directions:
Cut pvc pipe depending on the size you want. The one pictured is 40″ tall.
Drill 1 1/8″ holes around the base of the pipe.
Attach flower pot base to pvc pipe with screws.
Cover top opening with coffee container lid (or whatever you choose). We buy the large 27.8oz containers of coffee and this fit the 6″ pipe perfectly.

base of chicken feeder

Once the poultry feeder is complete I filled it with chicken feed and the chickens immediately started eating from it.
automatic poultry feeder
The beauty of this type of poultry feeder is that it works off of gravity flow. Meaning as the chickens eat the feed more pours out at the bottom. The same goes for the feeder that was created by Babbie. In essence I have an automatic feeder for my chickens. I have only filled it halfway thus far but plan on filling it to the top to see how many days it will go without refilling. The only thing I see that may happen is when filled to the top it may get top-heavy so there may be a need to have it secured with blocks or something to keep it from tumbling over.

I hope these latest chicken feeders I have shared with you help to get you started on your own homemade plans. If so, drop me a line or leave a comment and let others know how you serve up your chicken feed.

Additional information…A cone was added inside of the feeder to help the flow of feed. In the comments Ken added a drawing to help.

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30 Responses to “Raising Chickens–Homemade Plans–another Chicken Feeder”

  1. Love the name of your blog! :) What a cool idea for a feeder!

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  2. How neat. I will have to try this. It will be interesting to see how this one works out. :) Thanks for sharing.

    Love,
    Rachel

    Miss Rachels last blog post..2 + 2 = ?

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  3. another great idea. some pretty clever folks out there. I made a chick waterer with a gatorade bottle. I put a small hole at he bottom, a hair higher than the bottom, put my finger over the hole while filling from the top, tightened the top and set in a bowl I made from cutting a large butter tub down. Works pretty good.

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  4. Hi all. I live in Fostoria, Michigan. My wife brought home 8 chicks 3 days ago. I found out I was going to raise chickhens at that moment. I converted a ‘Dog-Loo’ into a temporary coop and suspended a 60 watt spotlight from the vent hole in the top. A remote read thermometer was placed inside to monitor the temperature. Made a watering station from a 2 lither pop bottle and a mixed nuts jar that had roughly the same size top as the pop bottle. This is what it looks like. Hope the link works as I’ve never tried posting here before:

    chicken waterer

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  5. Ken, Thank for sharing your idea with a photo. Great idea and best of all it works for you!

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  6. Putting a cone shaped device at the bottom of the feed station will make sure that the chickens will have acess to every last bit of feed in the feeder.

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    mary beth putnam Reply:

    hi Ken,

    the image of how the cone was placed was “moved or deleted”. could you send me a pic? great idea for a gravity feeder. I have been looking for one that will fit inside my coop for the winter
    thanks
    MB

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    Phil Sechrest Reply:

    Ken,

    Your image has been deleted or moved. Could you email a copy? It looks like a simple resolution to my feeding problems. We started with 14 chicks a few months ago (we lost one along the way) and would like to cut our feeding time a little. This looks like a good solution.

    Thanks,

    Phil Sechrest

    Wadmalaw Island, SC

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  7. Thanks Ken for the drawing. I also had to put a cone inside of my feeders to help the flow of feed. We used sheet metal to form our cone.

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  8. Will three nesting boxes Approx. 16 1/2″ high by 22″ wide be enough for eight hens, Four IDA Browns and four Black Australorps?

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  9. Ken, From what I have read the recommendation is four hens to a nest box. So I would say you have that covered just fine.

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  10. Thanks Carole. The future home of my chicks is progressing. The frameing is done. Next comes the inner sheathing, insulation, outer sheathing, and electrical for light and heat. I did a heat loss calculation on the coop. With a 55 degree inside temp and a -10 degree outside air temp the loss will be 1260 btu/hr four 100 watt heat lamps will put out 1380 btu/hr. The lights will be staged on one at a time by a Honeywell logic center I have to maintain within a 5 degree span.

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  11. What diameter shouls a perch be? Thanks.

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  12. I made my perch/roost more like a bed from a plan in an old book I read. I ripped 2″x4″ spaced 1 1/2″ apart. I did round the corners and made sure there were no splinters. It’s easy for the birds to walk on, and it keeps eggs from dropping through.

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  13. Thanks Kelly, how many rows of 2″x4″s?

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  14. Ken, We utilize a small tree with a diameter of 1/2″ to 2″ for our roosting poles in one coop. We use whatever we have around and modify it to fit some of our corners of our coops.

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  15. I would like to know if anyone has some sort of plans for a chicken tractor made from an old wagon running gear??? I would like to have them lay their eggs upstairs and range downstairs. It is a heavy duty running gear… I thought it would be ideal for this. Also when you have your hens free range, how much feed are you supplementing to keep them healthy and their egg production up?? What particular breed is the most efficient for free ranging??

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    Carole Reply:

    Elizabeth, I think that is an awesome ideal for a chicken tractor. I am not the builder in my house so I will have to consult with my husband to see if he would have any ideas. As far as feeding the chickens, I feed my chickens first thing in the morning and then let one set free range. So I guess I’m saying I don’t cut back even though some free range. I feed the same amount everyday, even during the winter. I feed a layer mash mixed with crushed corn and sometimes sunflower seeds. I have Rhode Island Reds, Wyandottes, Buff Orpingtons, and several Ameracaunas and they all enjoy free ranging but do well when I keep them penned up also.

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  16. Oh I forgot my email is natureswaters@yahoo.com and I live in south carolina. Thank you for your comments and helpful advise. A single,independent farmer. elizabeth

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  17. Well, I’m incubating eggs. 12 Jersey Giants in a home made incubator. The incubator is made from a coleman cooler. I wanted to be able to control the temperature very closly without error so I went with a thermocouple type controller. A thermocouple type sensor works off a principal that for any given temperature there is a definate resistance(Ohm value). No calibration is ever necessary. Also, I wanted to control the output of the heat source( 100 watt lightbulb). So a dimmer switch was installed to maximize the on time of the bulb. Just enough power for the job. The next issue was humidity. To solve this I fabricated a water pan that molded around the heat source(lightbulb). It heats the water thus increasing the ease of evaporation. A fan from a computer was employed as a circulating fan ensuring an even temperature throughout the incubator. Also, a wire frame was employed to conform a wick(old sock)to the fan. This allows me to move the wick further or closer to the circulating fan and control the humidity to a close degree. A perticion seperates the hatching section from the mechanical section. There are holes drilled through the section allowing air to return. However the particion also provides a resistance to airflow and causes fresh air to be dwawn ito the heating section. and warm air vents out an unsealed section of the hatching section,thus ensuring a constant intake of fresh air for ventilation. I also fabricated an egg turner that allows a 90 degree span of motion, 45 degrees each way. without poening the bator. Water is added through a fill tube and if overfilled an overflow drain prevents spilling water into the bator. There is no need to open the bator to turn the eggs or to add water to the humidifier pan. The wick on the humidifier can be adjusted from the outside too. Here’s a picture of the mechanical section of the incubator I built. Hope it will give some ideas for innovation to someone.

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  18. Does anyone have something that feeds chickens but stops sparrows?

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  19. hi this works perfect, clear instructions :) thnx

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  20. Hi all friends

    I use this feeder for my bird’s aviary.

    at Najam’s aviary video

    thanks.

    najam

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  21. Hi friends. check out my innovative feeder for birds. hope you all like it :P

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MY2SQ77ZoSg

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  22. It is a good idea to make feeder from PVC or plastic bottle. We do not have to buy it.

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  23. great idea. can’t wait to do it.

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  24. Hi all,
    I was wondering whether anyone knew why it is useful for a farmer or buyer to have a feeding plan for their chickens? you see I’m teaching the kids at school about poultry and this is one of the questions and when I tried google, it was HOPELESS please help!

    Becka x

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    Carole Reply:

    It depends upon what you are trying to achieve with your chickens. If you are showing chickens the feed is usually a little different than what you would give to laying chickens (at least at my house). Some feeds have more protein and nutrients than others.

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